Why Becoming A Physician Makes You Part Of The Solution

If there’s one sector that won’t see a shortage in job supply any time soon, it’s the health sector. Despite many advances in technology that make medicines work better and people’s life spans lengthen, there is still nothing that can substitute for the skilled work of a trusted health care professional. And what other job lets you save lives and earn a healthy 6 figure salary at the same time? Not too many that I can think of.

Many people go into medicine because they grew up around people who had health problems that they wish they could’ve fixed. For example, if you know somebody with high blood pressure, wouldn’t it be nice to know exactly what to prescribe for that person to make them better? Sure you could recommend they read The Blood Pressure Solution by Ken Burge, and send them to a blood pressure solution review to read up on it, but wouldn’t it be nicer to be able to take a truly hands on approach in helping folks with their medical problems like blood pressure?

Another great benefit of going into medicine is that as other job sectors suffer declines in growth due to the fickle nature of the economy, the health care sector is seeing a marked boom. Everybody who can afford it is still paying good money to obtain quality health care from skilled professionals. And those who can’t afford it now have insurance from the state to help cover medical costs.

Sure, this industry is still dominated by men, in part because of the technical nature of the job and the long amount of training and education involved. But whether you are a man or a woman, if you have a passion for helping treat other people, an eye for precision and are good at learning complex techniques, then this might be a job worth looking into!

Bear in mind that you need the tenacity to carry on with difficult tasks even under pressure, but if you think you’ve got the stick-to-itiveness to make it through, this job can really be rewarding. That means getting a bachelor’s degree, a degree from medical school, and years of working in residency, training for your big break as a doctor. It can be a difficult road — everyone knows medical school is a tough path, but you will also have to endure years working on the job and being exposed to the real pressures and urgent concerns as in a real live hospital or medical center.Aside from offering very competitive wages and benefits, there are also other opportunities that are available for you here.

You can choose from different specializations, according to what you prefer. This allows you more flexibility and also gives you the chance to keep learning and being better at your skill. Better skills mean better placement, career advancement, and a corresponding increase in compensation and benefits.

How much can you expect to get? Studies put the estimate at more than $234,000 in annual mean wage. However, you will have to put in years of work in training. How long? At least 11 years. It’s a long road from medical school to the hospital, but it’s a trip worth taking, if you’ve got the time, the patience, and the budget to go through formal training.

The pay-offs will end up worth it in the end once you receive your first salary as a licensed physician. The amount varies depending on the specialization that you choose; anesthesiologists for instance seem to get the most, with surgeons, gynecologists, and general practitioners not far behind, generating an income ranging from $177,000 a year to $230,000.

But aside from these monetary compensation, becoming a physician is a rewarding career path because of the number of opportunities available, the potential for career advancement, and the immaterial rewards: the feeling of being able to use your skills to save other people’s lives. Men’s skills are needed in this sector because of the technical expertise needed and critical thinking skills; you will definitely be in good company once you decide to take this route.

It’s one of the hottest job trends now, and the hype is real: it won’t die down anytime soon.